Bargello Symphony, Lesson Five

About halfway through the fifth lesson.

I worry too much.

Finishing Lesson Five was more Victorian step stitching. That’s when I learned the importance of a single thread. The framed motifs have given me no end of headaches. It’s a long story, there are so many words, so much over-thinking coupled with not thinking through a situation. How does that happen? I don’t know, but I excelled. Have you ever read Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler? I love that book, it’s one of my favorites of hers. I’ve only read a few of her books, and I stopped noticing when she publishes new stories, but Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant remains a favorite. <–See? Too many words. At any rate, I bring it up because the mother in the story observes that her children show their character in everything they do. My experience with these motifs are a perfect example of my perfectionism, pointless worrying, tendency to withdraw and unwillingness to be kind to myself. I simply haven’t had the heart to blog about this (tendency to withdraw). I’ve carried on stitching and frogging, stitching and frogging, and not blogging. The worst part is that I realized last night that my original frogging (before I even took this picture) was probably unnecessary.

When I got about halfway through the outlines of these motifs, they seemed to be off by one thread, and I couldn’t stand it. I knew it wasn’t a big deal, but I couldn’t let it go (unattainable perfectionism, pointless worrying). I frogged the outline (the probably unnecessary frogging). I over-thought the situation and moved them over two threads instead of one. This was also not thinking things through, but it wasn’t until I started step stitching that I learned that. Because I moved the motifs that extra thread, that meant there would be compensation stitches meeting the motifs over one thread instead ofย  the standard, non-compensated, two threads. This was bad because when you go over only one thread, it’s very difficult to get the same coverage as going over two or more threads because the threads have nowhere to “spill over” to, if that makes sense. It also looked wrong, and I realized the motif was charted where it was to avoid this problem. I didn’t mind frogging the motifs and step stitches near them. I’m a novice with compensation stitching, counted needlepoint, and stitching without a full chart. It was a learning experience.

But here’s the worst part, which I only realized last night. If I’d left the original outline where it was and let stitching nature take its course, as it were, it would have been just right. That is, just right according to the picture I was using as a model. I wasted so much stitching time over nothing. Let this be a lesson to me: It’s only a beautiful, inspirational photo. It’s not the definitive model photo, or the only, exact way for this project to be stitched. I’ve caused myself no end of trouble with this project, all because I love it so much and wanted it to be perfect. I think the most insane part of this is the frogging didn’t bother me. I was happier being unkind to myself and frogging a “known” um, “imperfection,” than accepting my interpretation of the instructions. Which, heh, turned out to probably be spot-on.

Ta-Da! Lesson Five complete.

Happy Stitching, and be kind to yourself out there. ๐Ÿ™‚

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3 thoughts on “Bargello Symphony, Lesson Five

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